Antique Cookbooks and Vintage Illustrated Cooking Booklets

These are original old cookbooks, not reproductions. We provide you with a link to the free ebook of the used cookbooks when we find them. Click on each title for more cookbook information, including condition of the antique cookbook. The cooking illustrations on this page are for illustration purposes only. A picture of the actual cookbook is available when you click each link. Paypal is through Paypal.

Taffy Pulling

by Rena

We saw the photo at masterfile for taffy pulling in the 1940s. Question. Have these masterfiles been taken recently and staged to look like the ’40s ’50s, and 60s, or are they historic? They may be historic, but they’re such hams it made me wonder. I like the pictures.

Dr. Miles Candy Book.Well. Here are some taffy-pulling pictures that are from an earlier time–or verified from an earlier time. The picture, left, is from a cooking booklet sometime between 1911 and 1914.

c. 1919: Lydia PinkhamSweets
This Sweet heart picture, above, does not come with a date. It is from Lydia Pinkham’s advertising booklet. All the illustrations in her booklets are so cute. Lydia gave us these instructions:

  • In handling or pulling all boiled candies the hands should be well buttered to prevent the mixture sticking to them.
  • If the pot in which candy is boiled is buttered for an inch or two down, the liquid will not boil over.
  • Flavors are more delicate when not boiled in candy but added afterward.
  • Use fresh cold water for each trial of candy; preferably ice-water.

1911 Home Vegetable Gardening free online ebook, in time for spring planting… http://www.todaysplans.net/Book-HomeVegetableGardening.pdf

Fact-checking and accuracy of Boston Cooking School Cook Book editions and reprints is gradually in-progress here. Links will bring you to free online copies of the book:

  • 1st edition, first printing, 1896. 567 pp. (3,000 copies; rewrite of Mary Lincoln’s 1884 Boston School Kitchen Text-Book)
  • 1st edition, 1904. 666 pp. plus 20 pp. ads, reprinted with appendix of 300 recipes and addendum of 60 recipes
  • 2nd edition, 1906. 648 pp. (Publisher: Little, Brown & Co.; revised by Fannie Farmer)
  • 2nd edition, revised, 1910 (Publisher: Little, Brown & Co.; revised by Fannie Farmer; added 125 new recipes)
  • 2nd edition, revised, 1914 (Publisher: Little, Brown & Co.; possibly last revised by Fannie Farmer)

Fannie Farmer was alive for the above editions. Before her death on January 14th, 1915, more than 360,000 copies sold of 21 printings of the book. She owned the copyright and made a fortune–being nationally known for her lectures, newspaper and magazine articles. After her death, her sister Cora was executor of the estate, and her parents, the heirs, and the following editions were released:

  • 3rd edition, 1918. 656 pp. (Publisher: Little, Brown & Co.; said to be partially revised by Fannie Farmer before her death in 1915 (she wouldn’t have included the War-time supplement), also said to be edited by Mary Farmer; includes War-time recipes supplement, cold-pack method of canning, drying of fruits and vegetables, and food values)
  • 3rd edition, reprint, between 1919 and 1922. 656 pp. (Publisher: Little, Brown & Co.; said to be revised by Fannie Farmer before her death in 1915, also said to be edited by Mary Farmer; includes War-time recipes supplement removed)
  • 4th edition, 1923. 808 pp. (Publisher: Little, Brown & Co.; probably revised by Fannie’s sister/executor of the estate, Cora Farmer Perkins; incorporates Fannie Farmer’s 1912 book, A New Book of Cookery, and about 40 additional ages at the back of book.)
  • 4th edition, reprint, 1927 (Publisher: Little, Brown & Co.; probably revised by Cora Farmer Perkins)
  • 5th edition, 1930. 831 pp. (Publisher: Little, Brown & Co.; probably revised by Cora Farmer Perkins)
  • 6th edition, 1936. 838 pp. (Publisher: Little, Brown & Co.; probably revised by Cora Farmer Perkins, with her son Herbert and Herbert’s wife, Wilma Lord Perkins.)
  • 7th edition, 1941. 824 pp. (Publisher: Little, Brown & Co., Boston, McClelland & Stewart, Toronto; revised by Wilma Lord Perkins)
  • 8th edition, 1946. 879 pp. (Fannie Farmer’s Boston Cooking School Cook Book; Publisher: Little, Brown & Co.; revised by Wilma Lord Perkins)
  • 9th edition, 1951. 878 pp. (The New Fannie Farmer Boston Cooking-School Cookbook on cover; Publisher: Little, Brown & Co.; revised by Wilma Lord Perkins)
  • 10th edition, 1959. 596 pp. (The All New Fannie Farmer Boston Cooking-School Cookbook; Publisher: Little, Brown & Co.)
  • 10th edition, reprinted 1964
  • 10th edition, reprinted 1965
  • 10th edition, reprinted 1972
  • 11th edition, 1965. 624 pp. (Title changed to The Fannie Farmer Cookbook; Publisher: Little, Brown & Co.)
  • Bantam Reference Library edition, 1965, 648 pp. (Title changed to The All New Fanny Farmer Boston Cooking School Cookbook)
  • Facsimile edition of 1896 edition, 1973, 568 pp. plus 18 pp. period ads (Publisher: Weathervane Books; title changed to The Original Boston Cooking School Cook Book, 1896
  • 12th edition, 1979. 811 pp. (“Revised by Marion Cunningham with Jeri Laber”; publisher: Knopf; first year sold 400,000 copies)
  • 13th edition, 1990. 874 pp. (“By Marion Cunningham”; publisher: Knopf)

Dr Miles Candy Book.

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1910s: Dr Miles Candy Book.

$3

Dr Mile’s Candy Cook Book was published circa 1911, no later than 1914. It has recipes for Salted Almonds, Candy Eggs for Easter, Cocoanut Taffy, Popcorn Balls, Cough Candy, Coffee Fudge, Popcorn Fudge, Maple Wax (made with snow or ice), Rose Drops and Jujube Paste (both recipes call for cochineal to color), and more. Much of the text is a call to try Dr Mile’s medicines.

Dr Franklin Miles was born in 1845 and graduated from Rush Medical College in 1874, and Chicago Medical College in 1875. He practiced medicine for ten years and in c. 1885 established the “Miles Medical Company” in Elkhart, Indiana to make and distribute his patent medicines.

Sample Text:

Almost without exception both young and old have a “sweet tooth”…ready to sink into a confection, especially if it is a home made one….candymaking is a pleasant pastime that serves to occupy the attention of the young at times when other pursuits, far more dangerous, might be indulged in. Who, indeed, will be bold enough to decry the old fashioned “candy pull” or to assert that the eating of even a goodly portion of “taffy” is injurious to humanity?

Candymaking, moreover, is a very popular occupation and it is safe to say there is scarcely a houehold that does not have a number who knows how to turn out a dish of fudge or some equally pleasing confection. The receipts given in this booklet are as a rule not of the complicated kind and may be followed without misunderstanding by anyone at all familiar with a kitchen….

Jujbe Paste.
Take two cupfuls of sugar, one-quarter of a pound of gum arabic and one pint of water. Flavor with the essence of lemon and a grain of cochineal. Let the mixture stand until the gum is dissolved in a warm place on the back of the stove, then draw forward and cook until thick; try in cold water. It should be limber and bend when cold. Pour in buttered pans, and eighth of an inch thick. When cool, roll up in a scroll.

Lemon Drops II.
Upon one cup of powdered sugar pour enough lemon juice to dissolve it, and boil it to a thick syrup; drop on buttered plates and set in a warm place to harden.

Cough Candy.
An excellent cough candy is made of slippery elm, flaxseed and sugar. Soak a gill of whole flaxseed in half a pint of boiling water. In another dish put a cupful of broken bits of slippery elm and cover this also with boiling water. Let these stand for two hours. Then strain them both through a muslin cloth into a saucepan containing one and one-half pounds of granulated sugar. Extract all the liquor you can, stir the sugar until it is melted, and then boil it until it turns to candy. Pour it out at once, when it reaches this point, on to greased papers. This is the old-fashioned rule. The candy is more palatable if the juice of two lemons is added to it after it has cooked for ten minutes.

Candy Eggs for Easter.
Get tin moulds in egg shape, or use small china egg cups. Melt half pound of chocolate and fill the moulds with the liquid, a teaspoonful at a time. Wait a moment, and then pour out what will flow. The chocolate which adheres to the moulds, will, after cooling, form the egg, and may be detached by tapping the mould lightly. Forming the perfect egg is equally easy. This is done by rubbing the edge of one-half to and frow over some warm surface, and then pressing it against the edges of the cold egg. The egg can be made solid instead of hollow; but this, of course, requires a much larger quantity of chocolate, or it can be filled with the cream candy used for chocolate creams, finely chopped English walnuts, or anything of the sort. The eggs can also be prepared without moulds by shaping the cream-candy filling with the hands into little eggs and then dipping them by means of a small wooden skewer into the melted chocolate, which, when it cools, forms a covering.

Marsh-Mallow Candy.
The foundation of candies made with gum arabic, that is, the plain paste, is what is usually known as march-mallows. They are easy to make, but very dedious, as they require beating an hour or more. Use to make them the very best white gum arabic, powdered, and double its weight of water, with three times its weight of sugar. The sugar is the fine powdered.

Toasted Marsh-Mallows.
Hold, on a long iron skewer, a marshmallow above a bed of glowing coals, turning it over and over, until the paste grows golden brown, softens, and the crust, breaking apart, shows the soft white centre. Eat at once.

Purchase original booklet:



One 1910s original booklet is available, Dr Miles Candy Book. $3.00. Condition: The booklet is in very poor condition with heavily chipped, (text missing), heavily stained, and yellowed pages, all detached. 34-page booklet. Click “Add to Cart.”

Light Crust Recipes.

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c. 1935: Light Crust Recipes, A Few Selected Practical Recipes for using Light Crust Flour
Tested and Approved by Mrs. Lenore Standifer, Light Crust Demonstrator
Burrus Mill & Elevsator Co., Fort Worth, Texas

SOLD

(Note: The illustrated musicians appearing on the coobook cover represent the Doughboys, a Texas-Swing-music band that represented Light Crust Flour between 1931 – 1942.)

“For more than 40 years thousands of housewives have used “LIGHT CRUST” flour exclusively and sung its praises to their neighbors to such an extent that “LIGHT CRUST” now stands at the head of the list, as the most dependable and popular flour in the United States. It is therefore to those housewives that we owe our phenomenal success and to them we dedicate this “LIGHT CRUST” recipe book as an appreciation of their patronage.”

Good Flaky Pie Crust
3 cups LIGHT CRUST flour
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1 cup lard
Sift flour, baking powder and salt together. Rub in lard and add enough water to moisten and make dough. Do not knead at all, just mix and pat together, divided into fourths to make two pies with top crust or four custard pies. Roll out amount for pie, spread a little soft butter on, fold over twice and roll, pressing into shape for pie.

Original Booklet:

One circa 1935 original booklet is available, Light Crust Recipes, A Few Selected Practical Recipes for using Light Crust Flour $17.00. The booklet is in good condition with heavily worn edges and scuffed. All pages present. 48-pages.

Newsletter

by Rena

Free Historic Cooking School NEWSLETTER using Facebook-approved form (privacy protected).
Google Chrome? you may have to select the “Switch” link before the “Register” button.

plus a free cookbook links — the first issue has a link for this handwritten cookbook…

Handwritten Cookbook

Letter to Mary about her making noodles at bucknrunranch.com:
Close to my heart — I loved making noodles last winter without a pasta machine. I tried about 2o different noodle-dough recipes from the early 1700s to the 1920s, comparing each one and finding new recipes and techniques.

We’re experimenting with internet radio on blogtalkradio today. The show is broadcast on Thursdays at 3:30-4:00 PM central time. Join me for a reading from the 1912 children’s cookbook The Mary Frances Cook Book: Adventures of the Kitchen People.
— Rena Goff